But if these service-providers are unhelpful, then proximity is clearly no safeguard.

Urban experiences are also mediated by macro-economic context, the sectoral composition of job growth, and occupational status. Alice Evans, Lecturer in the Social Science of International Development, King’s College, London Twitter: @_alice_evans This blog post was first published on ‘From Poverty to Power’ will be a sponsor for lectures and sessions at multiple conferences.

While Zambian market traders learn from a bustling diversity of assertive women, home-based workers are more socially isolated. (2017) ‘Cities, gender equality, and social change in Africa and Asia’. There will be a series of reviews of some of the influential books within the discipline that give some insight into how feminist geographies came to be.

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By honoring these accomplishments, the journal can show how students engaging with feminist geography are building the future of the discipline.

Publication of doctoral dissertation précis will take place in each issue of .

Girls think, ‘if I am educated then I can be a doctor’.

Here in town children see everyone going to school but in the village, they just see two people…

We also have articles spanning the globe from Scotland to Vietnam and more. A continuing agenda for gender: the role of the IGU Commission on gender and geography Shirlena Huang, Janice Monk, Joos Droogleever Fortuijn, Maria Dolors Garcia-Ramon & Janet Henshall Momsen Researching boxing bodies in Scotland: Using apprenticeship to study the embodied construction of gender in hyper masculine space Hanna Carlsson Citation matters: mobilizing the politics of citation toward a practice of ‘conscientious engagement’ Carrie Mott & Daniel Cockayne Occupational genders and gendered occupations: the case of water provisioning in Maputo, Mozambique Cecilia Alda-Vidal , Maria Rusca , Margreet Zwarteveen , Klaas Schwartz & Nicky Pouw Homelessness, nature, and health: toward a feminist political ecology of masculinities Jeff Rose & Corey Johnson What is in a name?

How caste names affect the production of situated knowledge Kamna Patel Cocoons as a space of their own: a case of Emirati women learners Gergana Alzeer A zone of exception: gendered violences of family ‘Happiness’ in Vietnam Helle Rydstrøm The editorial team of Gender, Place and Culture is pleased to announce an annual award valued at a maximum of US

How caste names affect the production of situated knowledge Kamna Patel Cocoons as a space of their own: a case of Emirati women learners Gergana Alzeer A zone of exception: gendered violences of family ‘Happiness’ in Vietnam Helle Rydstrøm The editorial team of Gender, Place and Culture is pleased to announce an annual award valued at a maximum of US$1,500 for new and emerging scholars.Submissions will be considered on a competitive basis, and each précis will undergo a vetting process by an Editor.Successful submissions will join the queue for publication.In this post, she offers insights into her ethnographic research in rural and urban Cambodia and Zambia and explores the way in which cities can catalyse gender equality and social change. People increasingly champion girls’ education, women’s employment, and leadership. Across Asia and Africa, urban residents are more likely to support gender equality in education, employment and leadership than their rural compatriots.Scholars have suggested several explanations for this trend: (a) the growing availability of contraceptives; (b) domestic appliances; (c) cuts in men’s wages and the rising opportunity costs of women staying at home; and (d) seeing women in socially valued roles. This holds even when controlling for age, education, employment, income, and access to infrastructure.Nsenga: Here in town a woman may stop school to give birth, then she will be desperate to return to school and finish. Seeing women dress up beautiful, earn their own living.

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How caste names affect the production of situated knowledge Kamna Patel Cocoons as a space of their own: a case of Emirati women learners Gergana Alzeer A zone of exception: gendered violences of family ‘Happiness’ in Vietnam Helle Rydstrøm The editorial team of Gender, Place and Culture is pleased to announce an annual award valued at a maximum of US$1,500 for new and emerging scholars.

Submissions will be considered on a competitive basis, and each précis will undergo a vetting process by an Editor.

Successful submissions will join the queue for publication.

In this post, she offers insights into her ethnographic research in rural and urban Cambodia and Zambia and explores the way in which cities can catalyse gender equality and social change. People increasingly champion girls’ education, women’s employment, and leadership. Across Asia and Africa, urban residents are more likely to support gender equality in education, employment and leadership than their rural compatriots.

Scholars have suggested several explanations for this trend: (a) the growing availability of contraceptives; (b) domestic appliances; (c) cuts in men’s wages and the rising opportunity costs of women staying at home; and (d) seeing women in socially valued roles. This holds even when controlling for age, education, employment, income, and access to infrastructure.

Nsenga: Here in town a woman may stop school to give birth, then she will be desperate to return to school and finish. Seeing women dress up beautiful, earn their own living.

||

How caste names affect the production of situated knowledge Kamna Patel Cocoons as a space of their own: a case of Emirati women learners Gergana Alzeer A zone of exception: gendered violences of family ‘Happiness’ in Vietnam Helle Rydstrøm The editorial team of Gender, Place and Culture is pleased to announce an annual award valued at a maximum of US$1,500 for new and emerging scholars.

Submissions will be considered on a competitive basis, and each précis will undergo a vetting process by an Editor.

Successful submissions will join the queue for publication.

In this post, she offers insights into her ethnographic research in rural and urban Cambodia and Zambia and explores the way in which cities can catalyse gender equality and social change. People increasingly champion girls’ education, women’s employment, and leadership. Across Asia and Africa, urban residents are more likely to support gender equality in education, employment and leadership than their rural compatriots.

,500 for new and emerging scholars.

Submissions will be considered on a competitive basis, and each précis will undergo a vetting process by an Editor.

Successful submissions will join the queue for publication.

In this post, she offers insights into her ethnographic research in rural and urban Cambodia and Zambia and explores the way in which cities can catalyse gender equality and social change. People increasingly champion girls’ education, women’s employment, and leadership. Across Asia and Africa, urban residents are more likely to support gender equality in education, employment and leadership than their rural compatriots.