For example: CREATE TABLE T3 ( a INTEGER, b INTEGER ); CREATE PROCEDURE addtuple3(a NUMBER, b OUT NUMBER) AS BEGIN b := 4; INSERT INTO T3 VALUES(a, b); END; .

run; DECLARE v NUMBER; BEGIN addtuple3(10, v); END; .

If the relation is stored, we can also update or delete the tuple at the current cursor position. On the other hand, should the previous definition be a different procedure of the same name, you will not be warned, and the old procedure will be lost.

updating using cursor oracle-41updating using cursor oracle-18updating using cursor oracle-49

A block has the following structure: DECLARE /* Declarative section: variables, types, and local subprograms.

*/ BEGIN /* Executable section: procedural and SQL statements go here.

The possible modes are at the end runs the statement that creates the procedure; it does not execute the procedure.

To execute the procedure, use another PL/SQL statement, in which the procedure is invoked as an executable statement.

Based on that value, I update another table's column.

Instead of this complex looping construct, I can use the following single SQL statement instead: This single SQL statement should run faster than the same work being done in the loop.This relation can be a stored table, or it can be the answer to some query.By fetching into the cursor each tuple of the relation, we can write a program to read and process the value of each such tuple. The advantage of doing so is that should you have already made the definition, you will not get an error.*/ /* This is the only section of the block that is required.*/ EXCEPTION /* Exception handling section: error handling statements go here. The executable section also contains constructs such as assignments, branches, loops, procedure calls, and triggers, which are all described below. C style comments ( or by putting the code in a file and invoking the file in the various ways we learned in Getting Started With Oracle.The simplest form of program has some declarations followed by an executable section consisting of one or more of the SQL statements with which we are familiar.