This man has sold Dubai to the world as the city of One Thousand and One Arabian Lights, a Shangri-La in the Middle East insulated from the dust-storms blasting across the region.

He dominates the Manhattan-manqué skyline, beaming out from row after row of glass pyramids and hotels smelted into the shape of piles of golden coins.

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In the swankiest new constructions – like the vast Atlantis hotel, a giant pink castle built in 1,000 days for $1.5bn on its own artificial island – where rainwater is leaking from the ceilings and the tiles are falling off the roof.

This Neverland was built on the Never-Never – and now the cracks are beginning to show.

Dubai was meant to be a Middle-Eastern Shangri-La, a glittering monument to Arab enterprise and western capitalism.

But as hard times arrive in the city state that rose from the desert sands, an uglier story is emerging.

Johann Hari reports The wide, smiling face of Sheikh Mohammed – the absolute ruler of Dubai – beams down on his creation.

His image is displayed on every other building, sandwiched between the more familiar corporate rictuses of Ronald Mc Donald and Colonel Sanders.

But Mc Leod says other changes coming soon to Hinge’s algorithms may help on that front.

“We pay attention to those kinds of things in the algorithm,” he says, in response to a question about how apps should handle people who regularly ghost their matches.

“What this does is it gives you the same benefit of the clarity in who’s supposed to start the conversation, without forcing one set of rules on you just because of your gender.” Hinge says it tested the feature last week in London and Washington, D. with tens of thousands of users and found that it decreased the number of matches that don’t lead to a conversation by 25 percent.

Of course, with just under a quarter of people saying they ghosted conversations because they got busy or forgot, that means there’s a larger majority who did the same for other reasons – they started dating someone, perhaps, they weren’t interested…or maybe they’re just a little rude.

One of its features – how users comment on individual pieces of content, such as text posts and photos – has seemingly inspired Tinder’s test of a news feed that let you react to pots of new photos or other items.