Showcasing the powerful indigenous art of a region that spans national borders, the book provides readers with an understanding of the Anishinaabeg as contemporary citizens of North America with deep roots in their Great Lakes homeland.

The museum’s holdings are rich in examples of Native ceramics from throughout the Western Hemisphere, stretching across forty centuries to the present day.

Published in 2008 to coincide with a landmark two-city exhibition in New York and Washington, D.

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This book beautifully shares his body of work.” tells the remarkable story of Navajo jewelry—from its ancient origins to the present—through the work of the gifted Yazzie family of New Mexico.

Jewelry has long been an important form of artistic expression for Native peoples in the Southwest; its diversity of design reflects a long history of migrations, trade, and cultural exchange.

Using objects from the museum’s collection, historical photographs, and the voices of Native Americans past and present, Debunking common myths and providing information about everything from katsina dolls to casinos and Pocahontas to powwows, Native staff members at the National Museum of the American Indian have handled a wide array of questions over the years. Written by an all-Native team of writers and researchers, this accessible and informative book counters deeply embedded stereotypes while providing a lively introduction to diverse Native histories and contemporary cultures.

, which grew out of a symposium held by NMAI in May 2005, explores the legacies of George Morrison (Grand Portage Band of Chippewa, 1919–2000) and Allan Houser (Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache, 1914–1994)—two giants of 20th-century art—as well as investigates the basis of a Native modernism by eliciting a broad discussion about the critical perspectives and practices of Native artists across North America.

Even more dramatic is the increasing number of Indian-run museums.

These essays explore the relationships being forged between museums and Native communities to create new techniques for presenting Native American culture.Also examined is the place of Native modernism in the canon of American art and the currents of influence between them.This full-color book celebrates the rich aesthetic traditions of North American Indians through the presentation of objects of exceptional beauty and cultural significance from an extraordinary private collection.“In [this] memorable book, Indian people use words, actions, and artifacts to represent themselves as fully human, free at last from the soul-cramping and spirit-reducing tests of authenticity and purity.” For the first Americans, a record of the past is written in the objects that were a part of daily life.Values, traditions, and beliefs are embodied in works of Native creativity, from children’s toys to leaders’ war shirts, and from Arctic kayaks to masks made by the people of Tierra del Fuego.The couple’s designs are inspired by the people, animals, and the natural environment of Alaska and recall the stories told to Denise by her Alaskan grandmother.